Tapped

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Tapped is a word I associate with pubs inside City Station rather than outside, although I haven’t been asked for spare change even there since the terminus’ refurbishment. The Tapped I am concerned with today is the pub/microbrewery/pizza house on Boar Lane just off City Square where I recently whiled away a very pleasant hour or so having lunch.

Although the inside is fairly basic, being a large room with not much in the way of frippery, the welcome from the bar staff was warm and jovial, and the service top notch. As the social distancing rules had been relaxed I ordered from the bar as I wanted advice as to which beer was not too potent but still flavoursome enough to handle the pizza I had seen on the website menu before setting off. It was a delicious old-style bitter at 3.8% but, due to the constantly rotating ales it is no longer on offer so I am afraid that you will have to furnish your own libation specification, which I am sure that you would have done anyway.

There is an extensive range of drinks on tap, who’d have thought it, including various casks and kegs covering porter, IPA, weissbier, fruit beer, cider, perry, lager and pilsner. You don’t have to be a brew drinker to enjoy the place as there are plenty of wines, spirits and soft drinks with coffee also available.

Once I had ordered I took my seat where I was provided with a packet of bread sticks to ward off any hunger pangs before the main event arrived.

The pizza I chose was the Tre Carne (Three Meats) comprising Cotto Ham, Pepperoni and N’Duja Sausage on Mozzarella. All pizzas are available in 12″ and 18″ versions, mine being the former, costing £11.00. Having delighted the large devil on my left shoulder I ordered a salad to appease the small angel on my right one. It contained Wild Rocket, Parmesan, Cherry Tomatoes with an Olive Oil and Balsamic Glaze, and a bargain at £3.50.

When the food arrived I was surprised by the size of the salad which could have sufficed as a light lunch in itself and was utterly delicious. I was also impressed by the provision of a side plate to give the choice of eating the pizza from the full round or separating the segments to eat individually or with a bit of the salad.

When it comes to pizza I am not a lover of a thick base, preferring the thin and crispier Roman variety, this was just a tad more substantial than that, but nevertheless was lighter than I expected and not in the least bit stodgy. I now have two favourites.

The combination of flavours in both the salad and the main were perfect. The salad having the freshness of the vegetables – alright, I know that tomatoes are fruit – contrasting with the sweetness of the glaze and the tang of the cheese. Similarly with the pizza, the spiciness of the pepperoni and n’duja tempered by the ham and mozzarella.

There are no desserts shown on the menu but there is far more than enough in the main courses and sides to satisfy all but the most rapacious of appetites.

So, should you fancy a pint and a pizza for lunch then this is the place as both are excellent and, although sounding a bit basic, the choices cater for all tastes. I can report that there was never a hint that anyone would ask me if I could spare some money, except when it came to the bill of course.

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Midnight Bell

http://www.midnightbell.co.uk

I have visited a few establishments since the lifting of lockdown but they were places I did not know so, as far as I was concerned, the lack of other diners might have been the norm for the time of day when I called. Today, however, I was made starkly aware of the damage done to our hospitality sector by the pandemic and the measures introduced to combat it.

The Midnight Bell used to be my local when I lived in Candle House on Granary Wharf some years ago and it used to get pretty packed on Friday afternoon so, as I was meeting someone, I took the precaution of booking a table for my lunch at 2.00. I must add that this was just before the introduction of ‘Tiers’ banning people from separate households meeting up indoors. As is my wont I arrived early, at 1.45, but instead of being met by the sound of office workers spending their dinner break discussing their plans for the weekend, I entered to the sound of my own footsteps. I had never seen it so quiet.

After the new normal procedure of checking in, hand sanitising and form filling, I was shown to a table where I was invited to scan the QR code provided in order to read the menu. I had a good idea what I wanted – a pint of Leeds Pale – which was brought to enjoy before my companion arrived. The lunch menu is reasonably varied with a selection of Sandwiches and Wraps along with some Light Bites. Whichever you choose you can opt to include a pint of Leeds Brewery Ale, Leodis Lager, Aspinall Cider, 125ml House Wine, Pepsi or Lemonade for an extra £2. No brainer.

My lunch date arrived and availed herself of the Leodis Lager offer whilst deciding on a Beer Battered Haddock Goujon Sandwich in Granary Bread with Home Made Tartare Sauce. It included chips or salad, again a no brainer! It was £7.50 and looked great. I was informed that it tasted as good as it looked.

Having perused the menu on-line before I made the booking, my fancy was taken by Crispy Pork Belly on a Dressed Mixed Salad served in a Delicate Pastry Basket, again £7.50. They use the same edible receptacle in which to serve Grilled Chicken Caesar salad but I eschewed this as I had enough of Chicken in a Basket in the 1970s.

The pork belly was cut into small pieces and certainly lived up to its description of being crisp, although still retaining the unctuous fatty middle which gives it its wonderful taste. The components of the salad were different sorts of leaves with chopped red onions, spring onions and cherry tomatoes. The tangy vinaigrette counterbalanced the pork belly a treat. Although the ‘delicate pastry basket’ looked like a popadom it was not spicy so didn’t overpower the tastes of the main ingredients.

The service, as you would expect with very few customers – a few came in after us – was exemplary and a second pint appeared without our needing to wait longer than it took to put down the empty glass on the table and indicate to the barman/waiter that we wanted a refill.

It is tragic that such a great pub seems to be suffering so badly, but as it is in the heart of the tech quarter which is so accommodating to home working, it is probably not that surprising. I also noticed that since I moved out of Candle House there is building work going on at the junction of Wharf Approach and Water Lane which renders the pub invisible from Granary Wharf, even I suspect, from the vantage point of my erstwhile 10th floor flat.

I strongly recommend a visit if you are in Leeds as they also have outdoor seating to the rear, enabling you still to meet someone from another household under the new restrictions. I just hope that they haven’t changed by the time you read this.

All photographs by Stan Graham